The Hungarian royal icing filled isler – Habos isler

Hungarian royal icing filled isler / Habos isler

The Hungarian isler filled with royal icing (habos isler), apart from its shape and the chocolate glaze, has nothing to do with its namesake, the traditional Austrian ischler. This cookie is a rarity from Szolnok, a town that lies at the confluence of the Tisza and Zagyva rivers, in the … More

Hungarian cornmeal squares with plum jam – Kukoricaprósza

Corn meal squares with plum jam / Kukorica prósza

This post is about an old Hungarian dessert, which comes from the western part of our country; Somogy, Zala and Vas counties are the homeland of the hearty dish called prósza. Prósza, which means lepény (pie), was the food of poor families in the old times, later it fell into … More

Bonfire stack – Máglyarakás

Bonfire stack / Máglyarakás

Bonfire stack or máglyarakás is a good example for food recycling: stale bread, crescents or sweet bread (kalács) take on a new meaning in this very simple, but variable dessert. This dainty is actually a flashy and tasty bread pudding enriched with apple, apricot jam and with a lovely meringue … More

Golden walnut dumplings – Aranygaluska

Golden walnut dumplings / Aranygaluska

Aranygaluska is a Hungarian Jewish dessert, generally baked for Purim. The name aranygaluska literally means “golden dumpling” and by the 1880s, this dessert was being referred to in Hungarian literature. Hungarians who immigrated to the US brought this dish with them, which became popular nation-wide when Hungarian and Hungarian Jewish … More

Kaiserschmarrn – Császármorzsa

Császármorzsa

Though Kaiserschmarrn is basically an Austrian dessert, but due to the years our country spent in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy it has been tightly integrated into the Hungarian cuisine, as well. Kaiserschmarrn translates in English as the Emperor’s Mess, it’s actually a shredded pancake, which has its name from the Austrian … More

Hungarian cream puffs – Képviselőfánk

Hungarian-cream-puffs

Hungarian cream puffs are so amazing and splendid, much better than profiteroles or éclairs; I always make them for Christmas. They are called képviselőfánk in Hungarian, which literally means “representative’s doughnut”. Officially the origin of képvislőfánk is wrapped in mystery, but according to a legend these cream puffs were served … More