Made in Hungary

Pozsony crescents – Pozsonyi kifli

Pozsony crescents – Pozsonyi kifli

Pozsony is the Hungarian name for Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia, the hometown of these amazing crescents. Pozsony crescents can be considered...

Fruit soup

Fruit soup

Strange though it may seem, in Hungary fruit soup is eaten as a soup, not as a dessert. If you look for Hungarian fruit soup in cyberspace, the...

White kidney bean stew

White kidney bean stew

In the Hungarian cuisine dry pinto beans are commonly used, mainly for soup and sólet. However, dry bean stew is made with white kidney beans. This...

Rose doughnuts – Rózsafánk

Rose doughnuts – Rózsafánk

Rose doughnuts shine like gems among the carnival desserts. Making these very spectacular pastries is not as difficult as it looks. It requires...

Ischler cookies

Ischler cookies

Ischler is an Austrian confection, named after the famous spa town Bad Ischl that Franz Joseph I of Austria chose for his summer residence. Bad...

Raised crullers – Kelt csöröge

Raised crullers – Kelt csöröge

Carnival celebrations are in full swing and we come to our next doughnut. Crullers or csörögefánk are small pastries made of rich, sweetened dough...

Bonfire stack – Máglyarakás

Bonfire stack – Máglyarakás

Bonfire stack or máglyarakás is a good example for food recycling: stale bread, crescents or sweet bread (kalács) take on a new meaning in this very...

How to make Hungarian sausage

How to make Hungarian sausage

Winter is the season of pig slauther in Hungary, the time when you wake up at the weekend to the noise of  gas cylinders used to singe the pigs...

Ribboned carnival doughnuts

Ribboned carnival doughnuts

Last week, on 6th January the carnival season officially started; a festivity based on rich folk traditions that lasts from Epiphany till Ash...

Log cake – Fatörzs

Log cake – Fatörzs

This log has nothing to do with the winter firewood, this log cake (fatörzs in Hungarian) is a premium version of swiss roll: a simple sponge cake...

Kaiserschmarrn – Császármorzsa

Kaiserschmarrn – Császármorzsa

Though Kaiserschmarrn is basically an Austrian dessert, but due to the years our country spent in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy it has been tightly...

Pork ragout with mushrooms

Pork ragout with mushrooms

If I want to eat some pork dish, which is easy to make, not time consuming, but not pörkölt or paprikash, I often prepare this pork ragout. Contrary...

Cabbage soup

Cabbage soup

This cabbage soup is my mother's speciality, I even venture to say that no one cooks it in the same way in Hungary. The widespread version prepared...

Let’s make szaloncukor

Let’s make szaloncukor

Szaloncukor has been an essential element of the Hungarian Christmas since the 19th century (you can read about its story here). Nowadays every...

Flódni

Flódni

As the saying goes if you want to eat good flódni, you'll have to visit Hungary. The homeland of flódni is Hungary, but nowadays it's also offered...

5 layer cocoa slices

5 layer cocoa slices

These extra soft, very delicious 5 layer cocoa slices are a very simple, nothing special confection; they look like wafer biscuits, though they...

Stefánia meatloaf

Stefánia meatloaf

Stefánia meatloaf is the big brother of pork patties. It's prepared from a similar meat mixture, stuffed with hardboiled eggs, and instead of...

Fried liver with onions

Fried liver with onions

Liver is often avoided, but it can actually be very flavorful and enjoyable if it's cooked right. This offal is a rich source of various nutrients...

Hungarian cottage cheese

This is what Hungarian túró looks like

You often ask me what kind of cottage cheese (or curd cheese or farmer's cheese - call it what you want) I use in the recipes. In Hungary the store-bought cottage cheese is dry and crumbly as you can see in the picture. So if a recipe calls for túró, I mean this type. If you can't obtain túró, you can try to make your own from whole milk. Click on the link below.

Metric system vs cup

In Hungary metric units are in use, all the recipes on this website are based on this system, so a kitchen scale is necessary. Since I’m not familiar with cup as a measurement unit, I convert grams to cups by using an online converter. The values in brackets, therefore, are only approximate volumes, so, please, double-check them before you start cooking.

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